A Typo, a Werewolf, and two Dopey Dachshunds

Retired Army Officer Tempest Michaels looks forward to opening his private investigation agency, but on his first day, he’s shocked to find a typographical mistake in his half-page newspaper advertisement lists him as a “paranormal investigator.” Like any sensible man, Tempest knows creatures like vampires, werewolves, Bigfoots, and ghosts don’t exist and feels certain his business is doomed, but while he’s arguing about corrections with the editor of Weald Word, his first client calls to request that he dispatch a werewolf, and Tempest realizes this blunder might not be so bad.

Which is how he finds himself at the home of a washed-up B actor who earned his fame as a celluloid werewolf and is now stalked by a deranged fan who can’t distinguish between cinema & real life. Then an anxious husband demands that Tempest kill the ghoul that has possessed his lovely wife (and provide photographic proof), and an elderly shopkeeper asks him to sort out the invisible poltergeist that shoplifts every night after closing. All cases are settled and everyone is pleased, but Tempest can’t help but recall that the werewolf looked awfully realistic …

Tempest is a man for our time — an experienced but modest retired soldier who loves his dachshunds, Bull and Dozer, without shame, and relies on his small but loyal group of friends who are always ready to help their pal solve a good mystery, especially if knocking stubborn heads or meeting pretty women are involved. And what modern single man lacks an interfering mother determined to marry him off to the nearest fertile female, even one pregnant with another man’s child? Within a few pages, Tempest becomes not just a narrator, but a friend, and following his adventures promises a phenomenal quest.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.